Shampoo Cocktailing: The New Frontier of Beauty Multi-tasking

January 05, 2016 THE KLOG

First came the oil-cleansing method (abbreviated OCM by those in-the-know) and then came the double-cleansing method. The latter consists of washing your face with oil, per OCM norm, and then following up with a foaming cleanser to ensure your skin is super-duper clean. From there you can follow up with all sorts of potions and essences and creams and serums and… you get the picture.

In a way, the double-cleanse was a forerunner to the cocktailing frenzy happening today, in which skin care denizens are truly customizing their products to their unique needs. For example, there's the multi-masking trend, which consists of placing different types of face masks on different parts of your face. So you'd put an oil-sucking clay mask on your oily T-Zone, but use something more hydrating and nourishing on the sensitive and prone-to-dryness skin under your eyes, etc.

I'm a subscriber to both the double cleanse and the multi-masking processes, so it was a natural step for me to move on to the trendy shampoo/conditioner cocktail. The premise is pretty similar to multi-masking: you use a different shampoo or conditioning product on different parts of your hair. Again, you want to consider your primary causes of concern. Maybe it's a lack of volume at the root, lots of frizz in the middle section, and really dry, crunchy ends.

Applying a volume-boosting shampoo on your ends wouldn't necessarily hurt, but you know what would be better? If you put the volume-boosting shampoo on the roots and a super nourishing, protein-rich conditioner on your ends. It's a simple concept, really, but when you think of the potential? Mind-blowing!

Another thing people have been doing is actually mixing their shampoos and conditioners together in order to get the perfect product for them. We were curious, though, about whether this was effective and, more importantly, whether it could do any damage.

For a pro's take on this, we spoke to Devin Toth, spokesperson for Rowenta Beauty and hairstylist at Salon SCK. “In general, I never recommend mixing shampoos because it's ineffective,” says Toth. “A shampoo's job is to simply remove free radicals and to clean your scalp and hair. You don't need to complicate that processes with multiple cleansers. You either want a gentle cleanser or a strong one.”

That makes sense, and it seems to be the general consensus among hair gurus. That said, Toth is gung ho about using individual products on different parts of your hair.

“I love using a strong shampoo on the scalp and a really deep conditioner on the tips of the hair,” he explains. “The conditioner can be a completely different brand from your shampoo or just from a completely different category of products within the same brand. No product manufacturer will ever recommend mixing products or brands, but I think the customized approach will give you better results and better hair!”

So there you have it. Thoughts? Are you into double cleansing? Multi-masking? Cocktailing? Share your experiences!

—Wendy Gould

Wendy Rose Gould is a beauty writer and photographer who lives in the middle of the desert, where sunscreen and moisturizers mean more to her than perhaps to the average human. She vividly, and fondly, remembers the first time she used a B.B. cream: in Seoul during a one-year stint she did back in 2009. She currently serves as contributing editor at xoVain and is an editorial writer at Refinery29, ModCloth, Latest-Hairstyles.com and other outlets. For Wendy, a lazy makeup day usually involves at least six products and probably a cat eye. Follow Wendy at @Wendyrgould  


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